Water Levels Rise in Paris & Seine Overflows

 

Feature Photo Paris Flood 3

Paris, France – June 2016 – Photo Credit: Bellanda

Although nothing like the Great Flood of Paris in 1910, the Seine has risen to impressive heights. As you can see, it has taken over the Quai and continues to rise.

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Paris, France – June 2016 – Photo Credit: Bellanda

 

 

IMG_20160602_124618

Paris, France – June 2016 – Photo Credit: Bellanda

 

Paris flood fallen tree

Paris, France – June 2016 – Photo Credit: Bellanda

 

Feature Photo Paris Flood

Paris, France – June 2016 – Photo Credit: Bellanda

As a result of the rising levels of the Seine, metro and RER closings have begun for reasons of security. RER C in Paris, the central section, will be closed from 4 pm today.  Due to its close proximity to the Seine, Metro Saint-Michel Notre Dame station is already closed, and several other connections are no longer possible.

– Bir-Hakeim sur la ligne 6

– Invalides sur les lignes 8 et 13

– Assemblée Nationale sur la ligne 12

– gare Saint-Michel (RER B et ligne 4)

– Cluny La Sorbonne sur la ligne 10

Please check with RATP for further updates on metro/RER closings/openings:

http://www.ratp.fr/fr/ratp/c_15907/l-etat-du-trafic-sur-nos-reseaux/

UPDATE: 

Exceptional closure of the Musée du Louvre & Musée d’Orsay on Friday, June 3, 2016 due to the rising level of the Seine. The museum staff will be doing what is necessary to protect works located in flood zones.

Paris Sans Voitures… a true pleasure!

Paris Sans Voitures 2015

Paris Sans Voitures 2015

Ever experience crossing the busy Champs Elysées or La Place de la Concorde on foot? As with many big cities, it can be a bit of a challenge, even with the pedestrian lights. I’ve been caught numerous times on the middle platform clinging to my little ones until the light changed yet again, praying that they wouldn’t jet back into traffic as we waited.

This past weekend was different. We got the chance to walk in the streets of Paris… literally! What a pleasure and special opportunity. It was the first time that the city of Paris liberated its streets from cars, giving the opportunity for Parisians and tourists to enjoy the city without stress and added noise/pollution.

Paris Sans Voitures 2015

Paris Sans Voitures 2015

Although this was not the kind of day to leave your real camera at home, I decided to simply enjoy the walk with my loved ones. As many of you know, my energy levels can be inconsistent due to my illness. Unfortunately, this particular weekend, carrying my camera equipment was out to the question. That said, I couldn’t imagine not sharing this special event with all of you. Hope that you don’t mind the smartphone images… it’s the spirit of the event that counts, right? 😉

Are you this guy? Remember… life isn’t only about work. 

Remember:  take time to break away and have some fun!

We had a blast creating this video & finding the most amazing locations in Paris.

All rights reserved Bellanda ®

All rights reserved
Bellanda ®

 AGAIN AGAIN – Music performed by AFTERMOON

Video  –  A Story developed & created by Steve Guibert & Bellanda

Thank you to AFTERMOON for trusting us to create this clip for your music.

Recorded and mixed by Benjamin Le Jean @Gaijin Studio

Mastered by Chab

Video  –  A Story developed & created by Steve Guibert & Bellanda

Directed and Edited by Steve Guibert

Actor – Jean-Rodolphe Laclau

Film locations : Paris, France – CD&B offices and Caveau des oubliettes

Special thanks to CD&B, Ramcesprod, Crisprod, Caveau des oubliettes, Kasia Dietz, Fanny Mikol Frequelin, Zoé Mikol and to all of you in the bar scene who helped make this clip happen.

Aftermoon Official YouTube : https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVxF

Aftermoon Official Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/aftermoon

Aftermoon Official Website : http://www.aftermoon-band.com

Aftermoon Official Twitter : https://twitter.com/Aftermoonband

Steve Guibert : steve.guibert@gmail.com

Steve Guibert LinkedIn : https://www.linkedin.com/in/SteveGuibert

Bellanda LinkedIn : https://www.linkedin.com/in/bellanda

Bellanda Twitter : https://twitter.com/BellandaInParis

Bellanda Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/Bellanda

REAL… NEW YORK BAGELS ARE NOW IN PARIS!

BRUEGGER’S New York Style Bagels at the foot of the Montparnasse Tower! 11 rue de l’Arrivée 75015 – Paris, France – Photo: Bellanda ®

BRUEGGER’S New York Style Bagels at the foot of the Montparnasse Tower! 11 rue de l’Arrivée 75015 – Paris, France – Photo: Bellanda ®

Yes, you read that correctly. REAL… freshly baked, New York bagels are finally here! Some of you might ask yourself why I would even care with all the incredibly delicious French pastries everywhere. France has some of the best food/bread/pastries in the world, and when I first moved here I couldn’t get enough of those French goodies. After a while, my taste buds wanted something from back home… bagels. Take it from experience, no pain au chocolate or croissant will do when you have your heart set on a warm bagel that is crispy on the outside & has that perfectly textured inside.

The craving can at times become so strong that you start running around, trying just about everything and anything resembling a bagel in hopes that you might find something that comes close to satisfying your desire. It’s not one of my proudest moments, but I even began to think about taking a trip back home just to get a good bagel fix… that is, until I saw the airfare prices. That would have been one very expensive bagel… right?!

There are those of you who might be asking, aren’t bagels already in France? Yes, it’s true. You can even find so-called bagels in local French supermarkets. To those people, the totally addicted bagel lover like myself might say, you poor thing, you have never tasted the REAL thing. A hard or mushy piece of bland bread that has no real texture and a hole in the middle does not constitute a real bagel.

After searching high and low, and waiting way too many years, freshly baked New York bagels of many flavors have arrived in Paris. Gone are the days when I will have to witness shops in France pull bagels out of the freezer in supermarket packaging, shivering in horror as they pop them into the microwave, charging me a fortune.

Today, there are a few shops that are trying to make more of an effort in baking fresh bagels locally, but those that I have tasted, lacked the true authenticity of what I considered a real bagel. Some say it’s the water that makes them so good, others say it’s the special process… whatever it is, locating a place that makes a bagel just right has gotten easier in France… Bruegger’s has arrived!

BRUEGGER’S New York Style Bagels at the foot of the  Montparnasse Tower! Montparnasse – 11 rue de l’Arrivée 75015 – Paris, France -  Photo: Bellanda ®

BRUEGGER’S New York Style Bagels at the foot of the Montparnasse Tower! Montparnasse – 11 rue de l’Arrivée 75015 – Paris, France – Photo: Bellanda ®

Bruegger’s began more than thirty years ago in New York, and have over 300 bakeries in 26 states today. I love that they use the same time-honored methods of New York bagel bakeries by using flour, water, yeast, salt and malt. In 2011, they joined the GROUPE LE DUFF and in 2013 they began to bring their bagels to France. After a successful, start in Rennes, France, Bruegger’s is now in Paris, at the foot of the Montparnasse Tower. They are hoping to have around 40 bakeries across France in the next 5 years. *Yes, I just did a little happy dance.

I was filled with nervous expectations and hope when I walked into the bagel shop for the first time. Wide-eyed, I tried to soak it all in. Bruegger’s Paris has a New York loft style, with an industrial feel to it… so far so good!

BRUEGGER’S New York Style Bagels at the foot of the Montparnasse Tower! 11 rue de l’Arrivée 75015 – Paris, France – Photo: Bellanda ®

Immediately, I noticed all of the, oh so familiar, products from back home… Each time, I bring my Parisian-borne little ones there, their American side seems to take over as they are they are instantly drawn to the Epicerie. “Mommy, they have Fluff!”

BRUEGGER’S New York Style Bagels at the foot of the Montparnasse Tower! 11 rue de l’Arrivée 75015 – Paris, France – Photo: Bellanda ®

BRUEGGER’S New York Style Bagels at the foot of the Montparnasse Tower! 11 rue de l’Arrivée 75015 – Paris, France – Photo: Bellanda ®

I couldn’t have been happier when I read the Baked fresh… all day long sign. YES… They really seem to get the whole idea of what bagels are about! There’s nothing like eating freshly baked bagels at any time of the day.

Bruegger’s ships their dough over to France, and bakes their bagels in the exact same fashion as Bruegger’s in New York and across the United States. These bagels are truly the best I have ever had in Paris. Even though, they are a little far in distance from my district, I just can’t seem to get enough of them. But hey, I can’t complain because it’s much closer and cheaper than buying that airline ticket.

BRUEGGER’S New York Style Bagels at the foot of the Montparnasse Tower! 11 rue de l’Arrivée 75015 – Paris, France – Photo: Bellanda ®

After being greeted with warm friendly smiles, we chose the bagel bread, sandwich style, along with a side of chips or homemade coleslaw. I’m so glad that they told us about their house specialty ice-tea, made fresh each day. It has become a definite must with each visit.

Bruegger’s has many of the typical sandwiches that you would find back home, in addition to some new ones. At first, I was reluctant to taste what they called the Classic New Yorker Burger… in all of my years in New York, I never saw or even thought about throwing a burger inside a bagel. That said, I just had to try it. What a great surprise… it turned out to be one of my favorites. Go figure, a New York bagel with a French-American twist… nice touch!

BRUEGGER’S New York Style Bagels at the foot of the Montparnasse Tower! 11 rue de l’Arrivée 75015 – Paris, France – Photo: Bellanda ®

BRUEGGER’S New York Style Bagels at the foot of the Montparnasse Tower! 11 rue de l’Arrivée 75015 – Paris, France – Photo: Bellanda ®

During our latest visit, we discovered that Cinnamon Raisin bagels are now on the menu (Yay!), and whole wheat bagels will be added in the month of May. They’ve also added a brunch bagel served all day long. Memories of my egg bagel sandwich & coffee rituals before work or after a late night out are flooding in. This was one of my all-time favorites from back home, and I can’t wait to give it a try.

Ok, now for one of my other passions… REAL coffee. I always make room for a coffee, espresso, tea or one of their specialty drinks. There is a trained Barista on the premises who grinds the beans and makes your coffee upon command. What a nice surprise. In addition, their freshly baked muffins are to die for!

BRUEGGER’S New York Style Bagels at the foot of the Montparnasse Tower! 11 rue de l’Arrivée 75015 – Paris, France – Photo: Bellanda ®

BRUEGGER’S New York Style Bagels at the foot of the Montparnasse Tower! 11 rue de l’Arrivée 75015 – Paris, France – Photo: Bellanda ®

I don’t know about you… but no visit is complete, unless I can bring home a bag of 6 bagels. I’ve got the entire family addicted to bagels now. This makes the New Yorker in me smile. So, Mom… please send over my bagel slicer for my REAL bagels… I FINALLY need it!

French Bread: Total Addiction!

A love affair with French bread! Bellanda ®

When people think of France, they often think of bread, cheese and wine. The products are so incredibly good that I have had countless meals consisting of just that, and would highly recommend it. However, before you run off and randomly pick a place to buy your bread, there are some things that you should know and look for. Not all bread in France is equal and not all bread sold here would be considered good by the locals. *Gasp!

Perhaps I have had too much time on my hands since I became ill two years ago, but have you ever wondered what makes French bread so good? Here is a little information that I wish I had before I came to France. In order to increase your chances of buying quality bread, look for the words boulangerie, boulanger or artisan on the exterior of the establishment. In 1993, an act concerning bread was passed and then amended into law in 1998 under the leadership of Jean-Pierre Raffarin.  As a bread lover who gained about 10 pounds on my first trip over to France, this is really a plus.

The bread act reserves the words boulanger and boulangerie for those establishments that use raw materials such as flour, water, yeast and salt. They knead their dough, monitor fermentation, shape and bake the bread in the place of sale. It also stipulates that the products used to make bread should at no time be frozen and that the bread in itself should not be frozen at any time. If these rules are not applied, the establishment must write the term dépôt de pain(s) or pain(s) on the exterior of the bakery.

This little piece of trivia might save your taste buds, and your meal. In addition, it could even save you the embarrassment of offering stale and dry tasting bread to your French friends. Yes, I’m not proud, but I have shamefully done this.

So, what is the secret is to making French bread? What do they do to it to make it so crunchy and delicious? Is it possible for nonprofessionals to make decent bread? Could I make French bread? While wondering all of these things, it struck me that I was living in a city full of truly amazing bread. Why would I even want to try to bake my own bread? Yeah, I’m crazy… my dear sweet man and I began testing whether we could come close to baking what might be considered, French bread. That is to say, if any bread could ever be considered French having been made by someone from New York. In doing so, I have eaten more bread than any petite woman should be proud of, but it was a lot of fun trying.

One of our many attempts at making bread. BELLANDA ®

One of our many attempts at making bread… I forgot to slant the knife when slicing the top, so it doesn’t have that pretty flaky layer crunch. Just another excuse to make more bread.
BELLANDA ®

I am not a professional baker, nor do I claim to be. This experiment gave me new-found respect for all of those bakers out there, making bread to feed the mouths of many. After more trial and errors than I can count, using various kinds of flour, proportions and techniques, we I have finally come up with an easy way to make bread. It is as close as we can get to the real thing. In addition, it stays good and fresh for 4-5 days!

In fact, we actually prefer our bread to that of any dépôt de pain(s). I know that this is going to sound crazy coming from someone who lives in France, but after realizing that I had turned more stale bread from uneaten baguettes into breadcrumbs than we could possibly use, we eventually stopped buying all kinds of bread.

We make bread about once a week (1 kilo of flour), that is unless my French in-laws are here. Then, we need to make it almost daily. Apparently, it is our fault, we are told. They just keep saying, “We can’t stop eating it!” Coming from my in-laws this is a true complement… both of their fathers were French boulangers!

After their most recent 10 day visit, I decided that opening a boulangerie is out of the question for me. I had a hard time keeping up with their bread appetites and couldn’t even imagine the number of hours it takes to make enough bread to feed such a bread loving country. As easy as our recipe is, I would have no life! Instead, I have decided to share the recipe with all of you. Depending on where you live and on your tastes, you will need to adapt the ingredients to your liking. For those of you who live in the USA, this might be a challenge due to the lack of flour varieties. Before I moved to France, I thought there was only one kind of all-purpose flour… silly me! Apparently, there are many different kinds. If you do manage to make the recipe work over there, please let people know how you did it in the comments section of the blog.

Let’s get started! Believe it or not, you don’t need many ingredients to make delicious bread.

Ingredients: Flour, Fresh Bread Yeast, Water, Flour BELLANDA ®

Ingredients: Bread Flour, Fresh Bread Yeast, Water, Salt, Flour
BELLANDA ®

For those of you who have been waiting for this recipe, I’m so sorry for the delay. I hope that the wait will be well worth it.

UPDATE:

Due to a “Nouvelle Recette” (New Recipe) for the brand of flour we used in our original recipe, we have made changes to our recipe. We now use 1/2 a kilo of flour Type-65 and 1/2 kilo of flour Type-80. This has gotten us as close to our original finished product as possible. If you find something that works better, please don’t hesitate to mention the flour in the comments section, and we will give it a try.

Ingredients for original recipe:

1 kilo of flour – ( 1/2 a kilo of flour Type-65 and 1/2 kilo of flour Type-80 )

625 grams of warm water

25 grams of Fresh Bread Yeast (I buy GB Extra Duo Cubes 2 x 25 g ) No, they are also not paying me to write about them. 😉

14 – 16 grams of salt (to your liking)

We use a mixer with a hook and carefully place the ingredients in a certain order. I am sure you can do this your own way, or even mix it by hand, but now that we found this to work best, we try to do it the same each time.

  • Add half of the water into the bowl. Then, add the 25 grams of Fresh Bread Yeast broken up into pieces into the warm water.
  • Add half of the flour on top of the water/yeast mixture.
  • Add the rest of the water, followed by the rest of the flour.
  • Lastly, add the salt (Be sure not to let the salt get in contact with the yeast)
Mix Ingredients BELLANDA ®

Mix Ingredients
BELLANDA ®

  • Mix ingredients until the flour mixture comes completely off of the sides of the bowl.
Mix ingredients until the flour mixture comes completely off of the sides of the bowl. Bellanda ®

Mix ingredients until the flour mixture comes completely off of the sides of the bowl.
Bellanda ®

  • Remove dough from hook. Cover with a cloth or plastic wrap and let sit in the bowl for about 30-40 minutes, or until the dough doubles in size.
Bread Dough Should Double in Size after around 30-40 minutes. Bellanda ®

Bread Dough Should Double in Size after around 30-40 minutes in a bowl covered in plastic.
Bellanda ®

  • Remove dough from bowl and knead with a little extra flour on the counter, pushing the air out.
  • Form dough into desired shape or shapes. You can make one very large loaf or divide it up as you would like.
  • Place on wax paper and cover with a cloth.
  • Let rise for another 20-30 minutes.
  • Warm oven to 240°C Bake  // 460°F  Bake – Place a water recipient in the oven. You can put the water in at this moment or  wait until your dough is ready for baking (we wait until we put bread dough in oven). The water will help give the bread that crispy exterior/moist interior that French bread is famous for.
Various Bread Forms and  Bellanda ®

A Couple of the Many Bread Forms you can make and Tools Bellanda ®

  • Slice the bread in a slanted, sideways motion.
  • You may want to use a spray bottle to mist a little water on the surface of the dough before popping it into the oven.
  • Promptly place the dough into the oven (on the same wax paper you used when making the dough rise).
  • Immediately lower the temperature to 220°C // 430°F
  • Bake for around 20-25 minutes, or until desired coloring of the bread.
  • Remove from oven and place on a cooling rack.
Fresh bread hot out of the oven! Bellanda ®

Freshly baked bread, hot out of the oven!
Bellanda ®

Sit back and enjoy the smell of freshly baked bread wafting throughout your kitchen. Your ears will also get a treat from the wonderful crackling sound the bread makes when removed from the oven. My mouth is watering just thinking about it!

Total bread addiction! Bellanda ®

Total bread addiction!
Bellanda ®

 ENJOY!

Do Parisians Really Need A Rule Book On Metro Etiquette?

PARIS METRO

PARIS METRO

Recently, the Paris Transit Authorities published a new rule book in order for Parisians to act more civil on the metro. These rules are written in an old-fashioned and comical way, and are accompanied by humorous sketches. To give you a little idea of their content, here is a rough translation of some of the rules. (The full French version can be found here: http://www.chervoyageurmoderne.fr/Manuel.pdf )

Rule N° 1 tells Parisians to be courteous. It reminds them that the enormous no-smoking sign on the metro platform is not a piece of artwork but a sign forbidding smoking.

Rule N° 2 tells Parisians to be helpful. It reminds them to offer help to a person wearing Bermuda shorts while holding a map in one hand and their head in the other. *Try not to be offended by the whole Bermuda shorts thing… Perhaps you will be more successful than I was.

Rule N° 4 also tells Parisians to be helpful. This time, it reminds them to hold the exit door for the person behind them. It continues to say that in life one should never miss the occasion to cross paths with someone who might give them a pretty look.

Rule N° 9 shows a drawing of a man dressed in old-fashioned clothing looking at the woman sitting across from him with binoculars. The rule simply states to be courteous. It warns them not to stare at people, even if she has killer eyes. Ummm… She? I’m going to let that one pass by reminding myself that this is obviously one of those French kind of things to say.

Rule N° 10 says to be courteous. It reminds Parisians not to provoke a duel with someone who has accidentally stepped on their foot.

Rule  11 shows a drawing of a sweaty French man holding the pole above his head, so as not to fall. Sweat drips down from his armpit onto some poor business man who is trying to protect his head with his briefcase.  The rule tells Parisians that on hot days, they should keep their arms down along their sides and to try to hold the pole from below and not above.

Although I find some of this rule book amusing, I believe it to be a rather ingenious way to push the focus and or blame on Parisians so that we don’t look at what is truly making the metro ride unpleasant for many. Parisians seem to be an easy target due to the existence of a stereotype that says they are rude.  I’m not even sure where that came from. Perhaps back in the day that might have been the case, but the Parisians I see today are modern, worldly and come from all walks of life.  They are a far cry from how they are being portrayed. No, not all Parisians are perfect. That said, neither are all tourists… but really? Are we at the point that necessitates taking time, energy and money to publish an online metro rule book for Parisians?

I am not a true Parisian, nor do I claim to be, but in this case I feel that they are getting a bad rap. After living in Paris for 11 years, I have taken the metro more times than I can count. I have always been an observer, and can attest to seeing Parisians help tourists clutching maps, among other lovely gestures like holding doors and giving up their seats for the handicapped, elderly and pregnant women. I have also seen Parisians jump to the aid of people with a baby carriage or heavy suitcase as they attempted to climb the metro stairs. In France, chivalry is far from dead.

These metro rules are all well and good. They can even be taken in a fun and light way, but somehow while reading through them I couldn’t help but look at the big picture. Let’s just say that when my naive self imagines a perfect metro commute, it doesn’t include any of these so-called rules.

My perfect imaginary world includes a metro station where I do not have to let trains pass during rush hour just to push my way on board one of the later trains. This perfect metro car would have enough room for everyone to fit inside comfortably, and have a ventilation system and/or light air conditioning so that we wouldn’t even have to worry about someone sweating on us as they reached up to hold the pole. The metro car doors in my imaginary world, open and close automatically with a lovely and calming ding-dong-ding chime so that I could keep my zen moment alive. As I dream on, I imagine working escalators throughout a clean smelling network of tunnels. Automated metro exit doors would give me enough time to pass through with my wheeled briefcase and then close softly behind me. *Sigh… if only.

I have read many articles about the Paris transit system’s plans and about how they are currently working on building a better metro system. Some of these articles even talked about adding over 100 miles of new metro lines. Wouldn’t it be great if their dream metro system and mine somehow merged into one at some point in the very near future? I don’t know about you, but that would put me in such a good mood that I’d even smile more than I do. Who knows? Perhaps smiling would even be as contagious as yawning!

Do Parisians really need a rule book on metro etiquette, or do they just need a more pleasant environment to travel around Paris? What are your thoughts?